Tue. Apr 23rd, 2019

When journalists knew how to make nougat | TV

When journalists knew how to make nougat | TV



Don Fernando, the owner of the nougat factory of the Berlanga movie Moors and Christians -interpreted by a homonymous Fernando Fernán-Gómez, who dressed the character with his own bad grape-, exploded before the foppers who wanted to bring new winds to the company with design and marketing ideas: "The nougat has to carry almonds, ¡ al-men-dra! ", he proclaimed in a summit scene that summed up the Spain of 1987: the one of the modern repeinados and the one of the gentlemen who perhaps did not know how to say a word in English, but, devils, they knew how to make nougat.

Sponsored Ads

Advertise Here

I've remembered a lot about this scene watching Breslin and Hamill: the voices of New York (HBO), which in English has a much more suggestive title: Breslin and Hamill: Deadline Artists, that is to say, the artists of the closing, those who converted the hurry and the writing to the limit in art. It is the portrait of Jimmy Breslin and Pete Hamill, two superstars journalists of the second half of the 20th century. Whoever wants to understand how journalism has changed since golden times has to see it. Breslin and Hamill made newspapers with almonds, and they knew that the more almonds they left, the richer they left. They never set foot in a university, they started filling columns in their adolescence and they learned everything on the fly, pulling instinct and guts.

When he was already a star, in the 60s, Pete Hamill was asked what he was up to. He answered that in nothing, that he had the writer's block. "What do you say? You're not that important to have blockages, "the other replied, and Hamill acquired a sudden awareness of who he was: a storyteller. It was not Joyce, it was not a poet waiting for the muses, but a reporter who knew the streets better than any taxi driver. A closing artist. Someone who might never write the Ulises, but, hell, I knew how to make nougat.

.



Source link

Leave a Reply