Sat. Apr 20th, 2019

When German families faced the truth

Juicio de Auschwitz: Cuando las familias alemanas se enfrentaron a la verdad


In the year 1963 a before and after was marked in Germany and it could be said that in the whole world. The place first trial of Auschwitz, in which a statement was taken to different people in charge of the Nazi extermination camp. It was time to talk, until then, there were many pacts of silence that existed in many families who did not want anything else to forget. Was there anyone who did not really know what was happening?

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But it is not easy to get rid of the past. Annette Hess He knows it well. She is one of the most popular screenwriters of the Germanic country and has never hidden her interest in knowing how the experiences of our ancestors influence our personality, starting with their own. A personal search and a reflection that has shaped what is his first novel, The German House. The editors had so much faith in her that, before she even finished it, she had already sold the rights to 20 countries and it had been agreed to take her to the cinema.






Before Hess finished his novel, rights had already been sold to 20 countries and it had been agreed to take it to the cinema

'The German House', the first novel by Anette Hess

'The German House', the first novel by Anette Hess
(Planet)

"My grandfather was police in Poland from 1939 to 1944. I knew it since I was a little girl but, since he never spoke of that moment and there was a kind of taboo to ask about it, I never related it to the crimes of the Nazis, "Hess tells The vanguard. "But, while I was documenting, I realized one thing: the Police was an important part of the Holocaust, so, although I do not know for sure, it is very likely that my grandfather was guilty. Now it's too late to ask, but with my book I try to fill this blind spot in my family, "he confesses.

In his book, Hess is inspired as much by his family history as by so many others in the country, putting at stake Eva Bruhns, a young woman whose life revolves around The German House, the traditional restaurant run by her parents and in which the family shares her day-to-day life: from the intricacies of her work in a translation agency to the longing for her boyfriend He decides to ask his father for his hand.



My grandfather was a policeman in Poland[..] I knew it since I was a little girl but, since he never spoke of that moment and there was a kind of taboo to ask about it, I never related it to the crimes of the Nazis "








The year 1963 arrives and, for things of the capricious destiny, Eva finishes collaborating with the public prosecutor's office like interpreter. As he translates the testimonies, he realizes the magnitude of the Holocaust and sympathizes with the horror the survivors went through. The young woman believes that her surroundings should feel proud of her for her work, but the truth is that her family does not make a dash of grace for this new job, to the point of opposing her firmly. Why do they all insist on leaving it behind? Why are missing photos in the family album? Is it possible to live the same when you see the truth?

"I would say that Germany did a good job at the beginning in the elaboration of the crimes. But I think that he focused too much on the perpetrators and forgot the normal people who made the Holocaust possible. In Germany I am having many reactions with my book. And there are many secrets in families that must be revealed. Of course, it's easier to focus on SS officers, monsters like Mengele, Hitler or Eichmann, but it's hard to see if there was someone in your own family who made this 'murder factory' possible, "the writer remarks.





That is what she faced. Since the sound documents of this first trial were available on the Internet in 2013, Hess dedicated himself to diving in a case that forced families to face their darkest corners. "We, as Germans, have a mission to remember. We have to find new ways, attractive to younger generations, to say that seemingly harmless racism can lead to a human catastrophe, "he says.

Annette Hesse, author of 'The German House', and Johann Zilien (i), one of those responsible for the archive of the state of Wiesbaden, consult the judgment of the first trial against those responsible for Auschwitz

Annette Hesse, author of 'The German House', and Johann Zilien (i), one of those responsible for the archive of the state of Wiesbaden, consult the judgment of the first trial against those responsible for Auschwitz
(Editorial Planeta / EFE)



Germany did a good job at the beginning in the elaboration of the crimes. But I think he focused too much on the perpetrators and forgot the normal people who made the Holocaust possible. "










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