August 1, 2021

There are already 518 dead and 517 cases of cholera in Mozambique by Cyclone Idai

There are already 518 dead and 517 cases of cholera in Mozambique by Cyclone Idai



The death toll in Mozambique from the cyclone Idai has risen to 518, the authorities said on Monday, noting that cholera cases have already risen to 517 in the province of Sofala alone, one of the most affected due to the waters stagnant that that meteorological phenomenon left.

The National Institute of Disaster Management (INGC) today added 17 deaths due to the catastrophe in Mozambique, the country hardest hit by the cyclone, compared to the 501 reported this weekend.

Added the 181 deaths that Idai left in neighboring Zimbabwe and the 59 in Malawi (according to UN data), the total death toll after the passage of this tropical cyclone in southeastern Africa reaches 758.

In addition, 843,000 people are already affected in the central Mozambican provinces of Sofala, Manica, Zambézia and Tete, according to the Mozambican government-dependent institute.

The UN estimates that there are more than a million and a half affected throughout the area and points out that the situation of vulnerable groups, such as the tens of thousands of pregnant women, is particularly worrisome.

Idai made landfall near Beira (one of the most important Mozambican cities) on March 14 and the next day moved to Zimbabwe, although, before reaching Mozambique, it had already hit Malawi as a tropical storm.

More than two weeks after Idai made landfall in Mozambique, cholera, a bacterial disease caused by stagnant and non-drinking waters, has exploded this weekend in Beira and nearby towns, leaving 517 cases of people hospitalized.

On Monday, 800,000 doses of cholera vaccines are expected to reach the area to immunize the main risk groups.

Although the situation is improving and there is more and more food and humanitarian aid, there are still many communities that are impossible to access because the swampy terrain does not allow helicopters to land.

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