February 28, 2021

The new European labeling of fuels comes into force

The new European labeling of fuels comes into force


The new, unique and harmonized set of fuel labels has entered into force this Friday in the 28 Member States of the European Union, the EEA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and also in Macedonia, Serbia, Switzerland and Turkey, with The objective is to help consumers select the most appropriate fuel for their vehicle, as stressed by the Spanish Association of Automobile Manufacturers and Trucks (ANFAC).

The fuel labels consist of: a. An exclusive identification form for each type of fuel; b. Information, within said identification form, on the maximum content of biofuel that is recommended to use in each vehicle that has a label. When defining both the forms and the information to be included in them, the maximum simplification criterion was adopted. In this sense, the standard of CEN EN 16942 opted for the following:

A CIRCLE TO REPRESENT GASOLINE. The information on the maximum content of biofuel is designated as "Exx", where "E" means "ethanol" and "xx" represents the maximum volume of ethanol that is recommended to be used in the vehicle and that would be available at the pump. Thus, in the previous figure, "E5" means that the vehicle can use gasoline containing up to 5% ethanol, and "E10" means that the vehicle can use gasoline containing up to 10% ethanol. The "E" for "ethanol" is an abbreviation to indicate that gasoline may contain ethanol and / or other oxygenates up to a maximum amount.

A SQUARE TO REPRESENT THE OIL. The information on the biofuel content is designated as "Bxx", where "B" means biodiesel and "xx" is the maximum volume of biodiesel that is recommended to be used in the vehicle and that the pump would be available. Thus, in the previous figure, "B7" means that the vehicle can use gas oil containing up to 7% biodiesel, and "B10" means that the vehicle can use diesel fuel containing up to 10% biodiesel. The "B" for "biodiesel" is an abbreviation to indicate that the diesel fuel may contain biodiesel in the form of methyl ester of fatty acids (FAME) up to the maximum percentage indicated in the respective label.

A SQUARE IS ALSO USED TO REPRESENT THE "XTL", which is a type of paraffinic diesel fuel manufactured from fossil or renewable material that allows to obtain by synthesis or hydrotreatment, a fuel very similar in composition to traditional fossil diesel fuel. The CEN Standard applicable to the XTL is EN 15940. "XTL" refers to paraffinic diesel fuel used without mixing. The EN 15940 standard allows the incorporation of up to 7% of methyl esters of fatty acids (FAME) in paraffinic diesel fuel.

A ROMBO TO REPRESENT THE GASEOUS COMBUSTIBLES. The information collected inside the form can be hydrogen ("H2"), compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas.

How to identify the fuel with which the user needs to refuel?

The label used for gasoline is a circle (where the "E" designates the specific biocomponents present in gasoline

The label used for diesel is a square (where "B" refers to the specific components of biodiesel present in diesel, while "XTL" means synthetic diesel, that is, it does not derive from crude oil.

► The label used for gaseous fuels is represented by a diamond

But, from today, what hose we will have to choose when arriving at the service station and going to refuel:

► If your vehicle uses 95 gasoline you'll have to refuel E5

► If your vehicle uses 98 gasoline you'll have to refuel E10

► If your vehicle uses bifuel you can refuel E85, as up to now

► If your vehicle uses Diesel you can choose between refueling B7 or B10

According to Anfac, the label is a visual tool to help consumers verify that they have correctly selected the right fuel for their vehicle. They also standardize the nomenclature of fuels throughout the EU.

"They improve the information received by the consumer of the vehicles, both of which they own and of any other they drive within the EU, without needing to understand the language," he stresses.

The new labels have now begun to appear in the 28 Member States of the European Union, the EEA countries (ie Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and also Macedonia, Serbia,

Switzerland and Turkey, which are members of CEN, so they must also apply these rules.

Labels must be affixed to new vehicles registered since October 12, on the fuel filler flap and in the specifications of the vehicle's manual. Petrol, diesel, hydrogen (H2), compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas from public service stations in all EU countries will also be visible and clearly visible the consumers.

Conversely, Vehicle manufacturers do not recommend placing new labels on vehicles prior to this date. The association also emphasizes that they do not substitute commercial denominations, since they are complementary and have the sole purpose of providing consumers with as much information as possible.

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