May 17, 2021

The Marvelous Mrs Maisel: Madame Maisel grows up in a world of men | TV

The Marvelous Mrs Maisel: Madame Maisel grows up in a world of men | TV


"The hashtags and speeches about the need to have directors and screenwriters are wonderful, although in the end it all comes down to a question of money. When the series of Shonda Rhimes or Amy Sherman-Palladino make money, they let them create more stories of women. And they open up opportunities for others. "Actress Alex Borstein has been in the entertainment business for decades and has enough successes and failures to keep her quiet: screenwriter, doubler, monologist … And now finally recognized for her charismatic high school The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, comedy that with its first season won the Emmy and the Golden Globe (as its protagonist, Rachel Brosnahan), with an argument that recognizes: a woman of the fifties turns her life upside down to the stage to dedicate itself to humor, land then forbidden for them.

The initial delivery arrived in November 2017 to Amazon Prime Video as a small series. But, with the premiere on Wednesday of the second round of chapters already plays in another league. It is the most honored title in the family of Jeff Bezos, one whose premiere coincided with the explosion of the movement Me Too and the claim of more roles for women in fiction. I could not be more up to date. The creator Sherman-Palladino, responsible for The Gilmore girlsHe says he was lucky: "We have always told these optimistic stories, we have been working for hundreds of years, sometimes it works, except for the fabulous clothes and extravagant coats, 2018 presents the same struggles." Midge Maisel would remain today a unicorn, a woman who He does not cover his mistakes and fights for his hole, which is why a young spectator does not think he is his grandmother, and in 20 years time the fight will continue.

The team of 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' in Milan.
The team of 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel' in Milan.

The cast has moved to Milan, where EL PAÍS is invited by Amazon, to make its great European premiere and show that power that this year leads its protagonists to even walk around Paris. "The good thing about Amazon is that you ask to travel and they pay for it, but that did not happen to us in the open," says the writer and director, always wearing a bright hat. Her husband, Daniel Palladino, inseparable accomplice, explains: "Our protagonist is going to take to the road and travel, destinations will multiply because Midge is from the world."

Between gestures of affection and internal jokes, she always willing to shut up whoever needs it, and he more timid, it is difficult to know where one's speech ends and the other begins. He opens the water bottle of her; she makes internal jokes about her mother-in-law. "We're bored with each other, we just talk to the press and through our publicist Tiffany," they joke. Their interaction makes clear the inspiration for the fast dialogues and riddled with references of their characters: "People in life are in a hurry to get to places, so talk faster, we look for that, it is an impossible choreography and we are dictators ", underlines Sherman-Palladino.

Rachel Brosnahan, in the second season of 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel'.
Rachel Brosnahan, in the second season of 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel'.

That cadence is what they use to make natural the unexpected friendship of the protagonist with her representative, played by Bornstein. A game of opposing characters that, for its creators, is the soul of the series. So they complement each other in real life too. The elegant Rachel Brosnahan, protagonist unleashed in the fiction when she comes on stage, has studied her speech after her perfect star image, while Borstein, raised in the screen of mostly male screenwriters of Family Guy (where he also puts voice to Lois), he launches himself to translate "hard cock" again and again into Italian. The first one has stayed at his hotel in Italy, but the second, who lives in Barcelona, ​​has been visiting and eating for as long as he can. "This friendship is simple, they do not force us to talk only about men, it's a more real relationship, where you tell a friend 'fuck you', 'do it better', 'stop behaving like that for a man' … we understand better, that intimacy is difficult to see, "they explain.

"The essence of the series is that women come together because they can only achieve this goal, a world where they do not have to be good or like men, they can make mistakes," explains Sherman-Palladino: "To get to change we have to break the cabal of lords who direct power and money, until women can not direct decisions, nothing changes, "he concludes.

The French Revolution

Marin Hinkle and Tony Shalhoub on the set of Paris.
Marin Hinkle and Tony Shalhoub on the set of Paris.

The season begins with the mother of the protagonist, until now familiar and submissive, fleeing to Paris to rediscover herself. "I've missed you, mom," says his daughter. "I've missed myself too," replies the mother. For the actress Marin Hinkle, this interaction defines that belief of the children that their parents did not exist before them: "I remember my mother saying how overwhelmed she was to work to get us ahead, I did not believe her sacrifice. At the moment I was controlling from above, now she has to take care of herself. "

If the first season was focused on the release of Midge Maisel, now is the time for the secondary ones to disperse and seek their voice. "They break with the predefined archetype and find their way in. Everything happens before entering a decade of cultural change like the sixties," observes Tony Shalhoub, who plays the protagonist's father and who for eight years played the protagonist of Monk: What they usually want on television is that you repeat over and over again your protagonist, that limits and bores you as an actor, here we evolve and the characters surprise us ".

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