May 16, 2021

The EU will not authorize medicines with omega-3 to prevent a second heart attack because "they are not effective" | Society

The EU will not authorize medicines with omega-3 to prevent a second heart attack because "they are not effective" | Society



Medications with omega-3 fatty acids are not effective in preventing more heart and blood vessel problems in patients who have had a heart attack, according to concludes a review of the data accumulated over the years by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), dependent on the European Medicines Agency (EMA for its acronym in English), that has issued an opinion so that they are no longer authorized for this use.

The review began last March at the request of the Swedish medicines agency. As reported the EMA, the CHMP opinion will now be sent to the European Commission, which will issue a legally binding final decision applicable in all EU Member States.

These medications contain the fatty acids eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA), which are commonly found in fish oils. They are taken orally and are allowed in several EU countries since the year 2000 to prevent heart disease or stroke after a heart attack (in combination with other medications) and to reduce certain types of blood fats such as triglycerides, a use for which they will still be allowed.

At that time, the available data showed some benefits in reducing serious problems with the heart and blood vessels, although these were considered modest and since then these effects have not been confirmed. Now, remember the committee of the EMAAlthough there are no new safety problems, the balance between the benefits and the risks of these drugs to prevent the recurrence of a heart disease or a stroke It is negative.

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