The EU sees likely that Iran increases its acts of cyberespionage | Technology

The EU sees likely that Iran increases its acts of cyberespionage | Technology



The breaking off Trump's nuclear agreement and the existing division in the European framework for this decision place relations between Iran and the West at a critical level. In this scenario of tension, the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) believes that the increase in the actions of the hackers Iranians

"The new sanctions imposed on Iran are likely to encourage the country to intensify cyber threat activities sponsored by the state in pursuit of its regional geopolitical and strategic objectives," ENISA said in an annual digital security report released yesterday.

The agency lists Iran as one of the most active global players and with the greatest capacity for the deployment of cyberespionage campaigns with economic and political reasons together with Russia and China. These three countries have always denied these accusations, usually made by the United States.

The deployment of this type of activity would be especially likely if Iran does not maintain its European counterparts committed to the agreement that limits since 2015 the Iranian nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of sanctions.

The sanctions imposed from Washington for the cyber attacks perpetrated by hackers Iranians have been described as provocative, illegitimate and without any justification by Iran

The US Department of Justice found two Iranian cybercriminals guilty of the attack that held the Atlanta government hostage digitally for days in 2018 by uncovering a sophisticated and elaborate attack plan targeting hospitals, government organizations and schools.

Iran was also designated as a participant in a espionage campaign made through Android applications downloaded from unofficial application stores that were designed to steal information through instant messaging platforms and social networks such as Telegram, Facebook or Twitter.

The sanctions imposed from Washington for the cyber attacks perpetrated by hackers Iranians have been described as provocative, illegitimate and without any justification by Iran.

Ciaran Martin, head of the National Cybersecurity Center of the United Kingdom, warned in a interview for the British newspaper The Guardian that the only question that can be asked about the threat of attacking the country on a large scale is "when", assuming that it is a matter of time before any European country becomes a victim of these cyber attacks. The scenario is propitious for this, thanks to the increased tension in international relations, the interest of governments in these activities and the technological developments that introduce new vulnerabilities and perfect the methods to exploit them.

The report also points out the interest that governments have in buying profits for espionage and warning about the danger posed by emerging technologies, such as Artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things, which, due to their immaturity, can offer cybercriminals holes through which they can easily penetrate systems to deploy their espionage programs. In addition, nations use various systems to mask and anonymize attacks, so it is very difficult to find evidence when attributing these actions internationally.

Cyber ​​attacks are focused on the weakest point in the chain of government organizations to attack infrastructures structurally from the bottom up, which can pose serious obstacles to the normal development of activities critical to the interests of a country, subjecting it to serious risks at a human and economic level.

"The United States plans to become a net exporter of oil and gas by 2022 and, if this projection is met, it will compete directly against Russia in the European market," ENISA cites in its report. "Russia could sponsor cybernetic operations related to espionage or support activists in the network on behalf of the environment to contain this new competition in one of the largest energy markets."

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