Fri. Apr 26th, 2019

The Erotic Mouth opens its sixth edition

The Erotic Mouth opens its sixth edition


"Rarely do we talk about female sexuality, about the true sexuality of women, and that is why there are few films that address the issue," explains Renée Beaulieu, who with her film "Les Salopes or The Naturally Wanton Pleasure of Skin", nominated best film at the Toronto festival, he wanted to start filling that void. "In the cinema, where female desire has not been understood or represented enough, It is difficult to present a woman as normal when she feels desire for other men who are not her husband and with the sole intention of enjoying sex ". The film by Beaulieu, which tells how a doctor's research on the relationship between skin and sexuality ends up altering her life, will be seen for the first time in Spain at the La Boca Erótica festival, which begins today at the Círculo de Bellas Artes .

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The festival was born as part of La Boca del Lobo, a short film contest in which, among other awards, a prize was awarded for the best erotic short film. But soon its creators realized that the subject was so broad and so interesting that it deserved its own programming. This year's make up 30 films, of which 16 are released for the first time in Spain and 26 of them are international productions.

The films will be presented in six sessions that begin today at 10pm at the Círculo de Bellas Artes with "Una Noche con Juan Diego Botto", by Teresa Bellón and César F. Calvillo, "Another Winter", by Francisco Javier Gomez Pinteño, both Spanish, and the American "The Course", among others.

"Les Salopes or The Naturally Wanton Pleasure of Skin" will close the sixth edition of this festival that tries to break with the taboos about sexuality. In the case of Beaulieu's film, the idea of ​​the couple as we conceive it today is particularly attacked, in which fidelity prevails above all else. "Society only legitimizes sexuality if it is linked to love, especially in the case of women", says the protagonist, played by Brigitte Poupart, at one point in the film.

In this regard, Beaulieu states: "Fidelity is implicit in the concept of the couple, which is the basis of modern society. But this imposed notion suggests that love, fidelity and sexuality go hand in hand when, in reality, they are not linked. They are social and cultural constructions that do not take into account a part of the human being that is difficult to master: sexual desire. Therefore, questioning sexuality, in this case, the woman's, immediately puts our concept of the couple at risk, and we do not seem to be ready for that. "

Another concept that Beaulieu challenges has to do with the title of the film: "Les salopes", which means "The foxes". A word historically used to denigrate women and embarrass them with that sexual desire - which in man, however, is seen as natural - and which the director appropriates to give it a new meaning. "Words, their connotations and their uses, represent cultures and their values, and are also tools for social and cultural transformation. In the film, instead of protesting the negative connotation of the word 'fox', I associate it with a sexuality represented in a positive way. In this way, I empty the term of its pejorative meaning and give it a positive connotation ".

Finally, Beaulieu challenges the image of the physically perfect woman created in Hollywood and chooses as a protagonist a woman who at her fifties remains attractive without going through the operating room and continues to feel sexual desire. "First of all, I chose Poupart because she is an excellent actress, I wanted a beautiful woman, but it was not a sex symbol," says the filmmaker. He adds: "My goal was to break the preconceived notions about women, especially regarding their sexuality. I wanted to focus on a woman who has sexual desires, who loves sexuality and who is not faithful by nature. Also, I wanted it to be a woman whose body exists for her own pleasure and not for the pleasure of man"

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