Wed. Apr 8th, 2020

The British Museum creates a platform against the illegal trade in works of art



The British Museum has announced this Thursday that it has launched a worldwide platform to combat the looting and illegal trade in works of art. The project, baptized as Circulating Artefacts (CircArt), is a collaborative initiative against the illicit trade in antiquities on a global scale, which currently focuses on ancient objects from Egypt and Sudan.

To achieve its goal, the British gallery has explained that CircArt combines information from a database on pieces that are restricted or that may be trafficked with an online public service.


So far, more than 4,700 objects whose provenance is unclear have been identified




Users who register on this platform will be able to bring objects to the attention of specialists so that they can assess whether they could have been illegally excavated or sold. So far, more than 4,700 objects have been identified whose provenance is unclear, so many of them are being investigated by the authorities.

The director of the British Museum, Hartwig Fischer, has affirmed that the entity “is absolutely committed to fighting the increasing levels of trade in illicit material worldwide” and that the CircArt platform “is an important step in this fight”.



The entity “is absolutely committed to fighting the increasing levels of trade in illicit material around the world”



“(CircArt) enables those who want to make a difference in a positive way (museums, government agencies, auction houses, collectors, sellers, and the general public) to share information and experience to help end illegal theft and trade. old, ”said Fischer.

The British Museum, one of the most important public museums in the world that houses more than eight million pieces from all corners of the planet, is temporarily closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.





Source link