Thu. Apr 25th, 2019

The archaeological park of Vallmora exhibits four reproductions of skeletons of the VI and VII AD

El parque arqueológico de Vallmora exhibe cuatro reproducciones de esqueletos del VI y VII dC


The Celler Romà de Vallmora, the
archaeological park located in Teià
(Maresme) exposes four skeletons of the 6th-7th centuries AD that were found during the excavations that took place during 2009. The archaeologist, museologist and cultural manager Antoni Martín He was responsible for those jobs. As technical and scientific director of Cella Vinaria ProjectHe was also the author of the Master Plan and the museum project.

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The original museographic project already contemplated these and other actions to make the visit more pleasant and contribute to the interpretation of the remains, but the economic crisis cut it short. It has not been until now, almost a decade later, that this chapter has been able to resume. And everything, thanks to a new grant of 28,000 euros granted this year by the Servei d'Arqueologia i Paleontologia of the Department of Culture of the Generalitat in favor of the City Council of Teià.





Reproduction of skeletons in the Roman park of Vallmora in Teià

Reproduction of skeletons in the Roman park of Vallmora in Teià
(Aj. Teià)

The reproduction of the skeletons has been developed by the company Toolbox GCI and the firm Gamarra García, who have also been commissioned to place them within the original funerary structures after installing a structure of iron and laminar glass to protect them from the elements.

The original remains are preserved in the El Masnou Municipal Museum deposit. His copies have been made with acrylic resin and fiberglass from the data provided by the graphic and photographic record of the excavation. The resulting pieces, exposed in the place where they were found, are the result of a preliminary modeling with latex-coated mud that allows obtaining an exact mold of the skeleton in its original position. Next, they received a manual chromatic retouch and have been joined with iron rods before finally being fixed and bolted to the ground.

Skeletons of Teià reproduced from the originals that are in the museum of El Masnou

Skeletons of Teià reproduced from the originals that are in the museum of El Masnou
(Aj. Teià)

The bodies of Vallmora belong to two adult individuals - a man and a woman - and two adolescents of around 14-15 years of age. The three skeletons that had anatomical connection were in recumbent position in the tombs. At the foot of one of them there was, accumulated, the skeleton of another young man corresponding to a previous burial. "They probably had a kinship relationship and were part of the same family," says Martín.





To determine the absolute dating, the remains were subjected at the time to the Carbon 14 test. The analysis resulted in a temporary fork that goes from 550 AD to 650 AD. Due to the context, they could be traced back to the end of the 6th century and the beginning of the 7th century AD. Surely they were farmers who would have partially reused the ruins of the old center of Roman wine production in Vallmora. On those structures of the imperial era they would have built a more modest place to live that was perfectly located and documented in 2003, before dismantling it and reintegrating its stone materials to the current preserved remains of the Roman winery.

Recreation of a Roman press in the winemaking center of Vallmora in Teià

Recreation of a Roman press in the winemaking center of Vallmora in Teià
(Aj. Teià)

Now, Martín believes that it is time to propose a new qualitative leap. "We already have a new Master Plan in mind," he says excitedly, and is confident in finding public sector funding and new sponsorships. From the outset, the technical and scientific director of the research and museum project, announced that this summer will be excavated a large ceramic kiln that is part of the archaeological reserve area located at the top of the site, which was already identified in 2004 on surface. "It will be an exemplary excavation, with economic resources and without haste," predicts the archaeologist.





Unlike the emergency and preventive interventions of the years 1999 and 2003 to 2005 that affected the urbanization of the sector, this time there will be no pressure, and the latest techniques and technologies of excavation, registration and archaeological documentation will be applied (systems of geophysical prospecting, scanning and laser-digital photogrammetry, virtual restitutions in 3 dimensions, etc ...), so the possibility of seeing how archaeologists work on the ground will be a new incentive to visit the only Roman winery in the entire peninsula which has the reproduction on a real scale of two of the largest Roman wine presses in Europe.







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