June 21, 2021

Sexual abuse: Who did the homework and who did not at the summit against pedophilia | Society

Sexual abuse: Who did the homework and who did not at the summit against pedophilia | Society


PHOTO: Pope Francis, this Wednesday during the weekly audience at the Vatican. / VIDEO: Statements by Miguel Hurtado, victim of abuse, in Vatican City, this Tuesday.

The historic summit that begins this Thursday in the Vatican to discuss sexual abuse in the Catholic Church is a turning point that will determine, to a large extent, the future of the institution. In total, 190 religious leaders (including presidents of episcopal, curial and eastern churches) are summoned to Rome for an appointment in which victims press for the speech of "zero tolerance" of Pope Francis will be carried out.

The treatment of the issue of pedophilia is very uneven throughout the world. While countries such as Germany, the United States or Ireland have advanced a lot, others like Spain are still in an initial phase. For three days, participants will meet with a staging similar to that of a synod and three central themes: the responsibility of bishops, accountability and transparency. Before the summit, the episcopal conferences should have met with the victims and filled out a questionnaire about their activity. The questions focused on the current situation of the problem of abuses in the local Church; the level of awareness of this issue among the public; the most important risk factors in sexual abuse; the factors that contribute to an adequate absence of responses and the most effective prevention measures that the country in question has adopted to protect minors.

This is how a score of episcopal conferences reach the summit:

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