January 27, 2021

Prize to a silenced journalist | Culture

Prize to a silenced journalist | Culture


Dozens of workers took the corridors of the Radio and Television Company of Galicia (CRTVG) last September 28 with their faces hidden behind a woman's mask. All were Ana Romaní, the emblematic professional of the regional network who has just received the National Prize for Cultural Journalism from the Ministry of Culture. The distinction comes to the life of this journalist and poet in the form of a paradox. After 28 years on the air, the executives of the company dependent on the Xunta have just withdrawn the prestigious daily cultural program that she created and directed since 1990 and that has earned her the award.

"I know it's a reward for my career and that it has a lot to do with my resistance and passion for culture and cultural information, but for me the added value it has is that collective dimension, because it comes at a time when the We are mobilized by workers of the Radio Galega asking for the law to be carried out ", underlines Ana Romaní Blanco (Noia, 1962) about the months of protests accumulated by the regional media against the manipulation of news programs by the PP and the breach of the depoliticization measures included in a law approved by the Galician government seven years ago.

Mobilization in CRTVG in support of Romaní, in an image donated by the Defende a Galega platform.
Mobilization in CRTVG in support of Romaní, in an image donated by the Defende a Galega platform.

While he repeats that he does not want to "be a symbol of nothing" and claims the "collective and horizontal mobilization" of his colleagues, Romaní defends a reflective, "investigative", pluralist cultural journalism and safeguarded from the "parameters that measure effectiveness and utility" . These principles are easier to comply with in the public media, he admits, although "what is desirable" is that they are also respected in the private sector. "Cultural information is not a demonstration of knowledge, but the desire to live questioning," he explains. "It is a sensitive matter that should not be subject to the dynamics of the market with all its tyranny." Faced with this ideal, among the dangers that currently threaten cultural informants cites the "empty newsrooms", the spaces "increasingly reduced", "the culture lost between the agendas of entertainment and entertainment", the reiteration of "places and topics "and the" reproduction of promotions and press releases as if it were information ".

For almost 30 years, Romaní directed every noon at Radio Galega on Cultural Diary, a space of 50 minutes, with a differentiated radiophonic aesthetic and experimental vocation, which in addition to informing on the plurality of contemporary Galician culture, promoted its own initiatives such as a prize for radio theater or Of Songs hoxe, a great anthology on the verses of Rosalía de Castro in which 36 poets participated. Between 2005 and 2009 it came to have five editors and ten specialized critics in different fields, but from there the resources were decreasing. "I'm receiving messages from the audience that alone justify these years of work," he says nostalgically.

The program was withdrawn in September by CRTVG's management between protests of cultural and journalism personalities, and replaced, under the same name, by a format cut out of cultural newscasts that Romaní no longer directs. She, who calls on citizens to defend public media such as education and health, says they do not share "neither the criteria nor the objectives" of the new space. Cultural information, he stresses, is not just a matter of broadcast time, but "of focus, narrative, language, analysis, debate, coherence and the dignity with which the audience is treated": "Journalism demands to be always vigilant of what you do and who serves. This mobilization [en la radio y televisión de Galicia] It emphasizes that workers are concerned about the social function of their work. We are many and very diverse. "

In addition to "her constant work promoting culture and radio with her own formats", the jury of the National Prize for Journalism Culture highlights the Galician journalist's "vision of critical feminism and social commitment." Of the violet wave that runs Nowadays, a part of the planet, Romaní not only hopes that women will occupy the same spaces of participation as men, but a "social change, another world." One of his poems says: "We do not want a place, we want outro place "(We do not want a site, we want another place).

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