June 15, 2021

'Outlander', when the Scots met the Cherokees | TV

'Outlander', when the Scots met the Cherokees | TV


A few days before the visit of EL PAÍS to the filming of the fourth season of Outlander Last March, Glasgow had been cut off by a major snowstorm. The team of the series is used to dealing with the inclement weather in Scotland, and have only had to cancel the filming one day of the more than 500 they carry on their backs and it was because of the wind. On this occasion, the snow only forced to change and delay the plans. Despite the freezing cold outside and in the corridors of the studios, the atmosphere in the Lallybroch lounge is mild. "This is one of the best sets, the warmest ones, even too much, because they light a fire, then the lights … and you end up boiling," says Sam Heughan sitting in the set where part of the interviews of this visit take place to which EL PAÍS is invited by Movistar +.

The fourth installment of the television production based on Diana Gabaldon's novels that tell the story of love – time travel through – of an English nurse of the twentieth century (by now she is a doctor) and an 18th-century Scottish warrior starts on Monday, November 5 in Movistar Series in dual version. Adventures and historical facts are mixed in a plot that now takes its protagonists to the America of the English colonies, with Claire and Jamie Fraser in the North Carolina of 1767, a few years before the American War of Independence takes place (1775-1783).

'Outlander', when the Scots met the Cherokees

But before that time arrives, the couple has a rest time that they will use to find a place to settle down and finally live as a family. "This season focuses on the theme of home, which means home and family," says screenwriter and producer Matthew B. Roberts. "Before, there have always been fights or trips and there has not been much calm, we will now see moments of domestic tranquility, a situation in which we have never seen Jamie and Claire, it has been great to interpret that part of the couple, especially now that they are more mature and each of them brings different qualities ", says the actress Caitriona Balfe, Claire in fiction.

The North Carolina in which the protagonists form their home has actually been recorded in Scottish lands. "I traveled to North Carolina by car, I wanted to see the Cordillera Azul by myself, and I've lived in Scotland for almost six years and I know the terrain quite well, and believe it or not, we can recreate North Carolina in Scotland very well. When you enter the woods, you can not tell if you are in one place or another, "explains Roberts.

'Outlander', when the Scots met the Cherokees

Pictures of Native Americans and Caitriona Balfe dressed in furs decorate the walls of the costume department of the series. Because the protagonist couple will now know tribes like the Mohawks and the Cherokees. "When I was in North Carolina, I met with the head of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and with experts in the tribe, and some of us hired them as advisors, trying to be as faithful as possible to that culture as far as possible, and We do the same with the Mohawks, that helps tell the real story, Hollywood has not always shown the culture of the Native Americans in the most sensitive way, for now, the advisors we have are happy with what we are doing, "Roberts explains. . To give life to the natives, the series made a casting in the United States and Canada and moved the actors to Scotland to record. "We have always wanted to reflect things as they are.When we treated the Scottish culture we had Gaelic advisors and experts, at the Battle of Culloden … From day one it has been very important for us," adds the producer.

In the book Drums of Autumn, the fourth of the series Forastera and whose plot collects this season, Jamie Fraser highlights similarities between Native Americans and Scottish clans, something also noted by his interpreter, Sam Heughan: "the values ​​they have are similar, the connection with the earth, with the seasons … They are warlike people who feel displaced, In fact, it seems that in reality, the Scots and the Native Americans talked a lot to each other, they had dealings and they came to be integrated I think there's a kind of respect and in the series you see that, warrior talking to a warrior. "

'Outlander', when the Scots met the Cherokees

In addition to the natives and the settlers, Outlander delves into slavery this year through the plantation owned by Jocasta, Jamie's aunt. "We approach from the prism of someone who comes from a more progressive time and who clearly sees that the fact that something exists does not suppose that it is correct." It is one of the most interesting things that a series that involves time travel can offer. , the perspective of the past from the future, "says actress Maria Doyle Kennedy, Yocasta in fiction and one of the novelties in the cast with Ed Speleers, who plays the pirate Stephen Bonnet.

The good response of the series, which has a strong fan base inherited, in part, from the millions of readers of the books, has allowed it to renew for two more seasons before even releasing the fourth. Where is the secret to the success of Outlander? "I think that at the heart of the series is that beautiful aspirational love story, with which anyone can connect in some way, it's something you dream about, you've experienced, you've lost … Besides, there's the action, the historical drama, it's beautiful to see … In some way, it allows some escapism, which is something that many people need today.life is complicated for many people at this time, many people find it difficult to reach of the month, people are working hard and very hard, you just have to see the crisis because of the high consumption of opiates in the US People are disconnected from each other, the idea of ​​community is falling apart and the series that have in the center, that idea of ​​connection, the family and the community, work because it's something that people are longing for. " That and see how a love story evolves capable of resisting two centuries of separation.

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