Martín Villa denies that there was a "systematic and deliberate plan" to eliminate political enemies in the 1970s


Former Minister Rodolfo Martín Villa has acknowledged this Monday that he could be "politically and criminally responsible" for the alleged homicides and torture committed in the 1970s – which led to his prosecution in Argentina for crimes against humanity – but has ruled out that there was a "systematic, deliberate and generalized plan" that consisted in the elimination of the political opponent.


Four former presidents of the Government write letters of support to Martín Villa to the judge of the Argentine complaint

Four former presidents of the Government write letters of support to Martín Villa to the judge of the Argentine complaint

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"The music and lyrics of the memory law are very similar to the imputation of the Argentine complaint," defended the former head of the Interior at an informative breakfast, his first intervention after the Argentine Justice revoked his prosecution last month December, understanding that there was no "direct or indirect, circumstantial, varied and/or unequivocal compatible evidence" of the crimes against humanity attributed to him.

"It would have been possible that in a fit of madness I could have been the material author. What was not possible is that I was part of some governments, specifically of the Transition, which devised a plan to terrorize the Spanish supporters of a government democratic," he maintained.

In his opinion, "saying" that the leaders of the first governments of democracy dedicated themselves to eliminating "the most representative people of that stage" is a "lie that has very short legs." "It makes no sense to use that word in the lawsuit when, if the Transition had an enemy, it was terrorism," he added.



Although critical of the memory law, Martín Villa did consider it correct to "remove people from the graves," one of the key aspects of the new law, which aims to promote thousands of exhumations.

At the gates of the venue where the act was taking place, members of Ceaqua, the association that promotes the Argentine lawsuit, have demonstrated asking for justice for the victims of the crimes of Francoism and have distributed information about the judicial process in the South American country, the unique in which crimes committed in the Civil War and the dictatorship are investigated.

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