Sat. Dec 7th, 2019

Labor mobility grows at the slowest pace since 2014 | Economy


The number of workers who packed their bags to look for opportunities in another Spanish region throughout 2018 was the highest in nine years: 144,145 people chose to move, according to the latest labor market mobility statistics published on Tuesday by the Tax agency – which does not include the regional communities of Navarra and the Basque Country. The data confirms the good progress of the economy in general and the consequent recovery of the labor market. But with a nuance: the growth in the number of employees who moved autonomy during the past year was 3.3% over the previous one, the lowest rate since 2014.

The behavior of labor mobility usually goes hand in hand with economic evolution. After hitting bottom in 2013, the displacements of workers from one region to another were growing in recent years at an increasingly sustained rate as the economy regained strength, although they never reached the levels of boom of the brick In 2006, there were 237,886 people who moved for work reasons.

The one that barely changed was the dynamics. Madrid and Catalonia were and continue to be the regions that have the best balance – fewer departures – according to the statistics of the Treasury, which only takes into account employees.


The resulting balance between people who leave and arrive in each Autonomous Community.

Evolution of the number

of displaced

Source: Tax Agency

Resulting balance between people leaving

and arrive in each Autonomous Community.

Evolution of the number of displaced persons

Source: Tax Agency

The resulting balance between people who leave and arrive in each Autonomous Community.

Evolution of the number of displaced persons

The resulting balance between people who leave and arrive in each Autonomous Community.

Source: Tax Agency

Labor mobility grows at the slowest pace since 2014



In 2018, Madrid saw 26,269 workers leave the community, but at the same time it was the destination chosen by 40,939 employees. 8,616 of them came from Castilla-La Mancha, which meant the largest transfer of all statistics from one region to another. Catalonia, meanwhile, received 19,225 employees from other autonomies, compared to 14,052 who left, most of them to Madrid. Even so, it achieved a positive balance in more than 5,000 people. The islands (Canary and Balearic Islands) also had positive balances, thanks to the push of tourism and, to a lesser extent, La Rioja.

The trend is clear and points to a pattern that is not exclusive to Spain: the concentration of workers in territories with greater economic dynamism, that is, Catalonia and Madrid, in front of the most stagnant areas. The clearest example is offered by Extremadura: the community with the lowest income in Spain has the worst ratio between arrivals and departures. This autonomy had a negative balance of 3,000 employees over the past year, which represents 0.9% of the total number of workers who stayed.


And.

Ara.

Ast.

Bal.

Dog.

Qty

CyL

CLM

Cat.

CVal.

Ext.

Gal.

Mad

Mur.

River.

And.

Ara.

Ast.

Bal.

Dog.

Qty

CyL

CLM

Cat.

CVal.

Ext.

Gal.

Mad

Mur.

River.

Source: Tax Agency.

Transfers between autonomous communities

And.

Ara.

Ast.

Bal.

Dog.

Qty

CyL

CLM

Cat.

CVal.

Ext.

Gal.

Mad

Mur.

River.

And.

Ara.

Ast.

Bal.

Dog.

Qty

CyL

CLM

Cat.

CVal.

Ext.

Gal.

Mad

Mur.

River.

Source: Tax Agency.

Transfers between autonomous communities

Andalusia

Aragon

Asturias

Balearics

Canary Islands

Cantabria

C. and León

C.-La Mancha

Catalonia

C. Valenciana

Estremadura

Galicia

Madrid

Murcia

The Rioja

Andalusia

Aragon

Asturias

Balearics

Canary Islands

Cantabria

C. and León

C.-La Mancha

Catalonia

C. Valenciana

Estremadura

Galicia

Madrid

Murcia

The Rioja

Source: Tax Agency.

A similar fate that is repeated one more year was Castilla y León and Castilla-La Mancha. The balance between inputs and outputs was negative in both regions in more than 4,000 people. Most of them left for Madrid.

Also the bulk of the workers in Andalusia who decided to pack up to move to another community ended up settling in the capital: 8,402 people, compared to 3,998 who opted for Catalonia. Andalusia, after Madrid, is the region with the most flows in departures, and the third in entries, after Catalonia. Despite this, the balance was not positive: 23,546 people left the community compared to 14,498 who, on the contrary, moved there for work reasons. The result is a negative net balance of more than 9,000 people, the highest in absolute terms.

The youngest move
to Madrid

Madrid was also the autonomy that welcomed more young people: 4,524 children under 26 chose it as a work destination throughout 2018. Most of them arrived from Andalusia, Castilla-La Mancha and Castilla y León, in this order and online with the migratory pattern of the rest of the workers of these three regions who decided to move. Catalonia was the second community that received more young people, almost 2,000, but its origin was somewhat different. Although the bulk arrived from Andalusia, the other two communities that presented the largest transfer of workers in favor of Catalonia were Madrid and the Valencian Community.

(tagsToTranslate) mobility (t) labor (t) grow (t) lower (t) pace (t) 2014 (t) number (t) wage earner (t) move (t) community (t) 2018 (t) be ( t) 3 (t) 3% (t) older (t) year (t) previous



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