James Rhodes will create a social foundation with which he will pay for electricity in residences

The pianist james rhodes has announced on social networks the creation of a social foundation from which, among other things, it will collaborate with food banks, pay for electricity in residences and hospitals, help in shelters and provide psychological help. Rhodes has explained that he has instructed his attorney for his foundation, and that it will take "a few weeks" to be "operational" due to the "staggering amount of paperwork to complete and certify."

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The artist wants it to be ready as soon as possible, and has also started a query on Twitter to ask his followers where he wants the foundation's money to be spent. "I think it's better for everyone to give away money than to buy shit that I really don't need," she has assured and asked for ideas in the form of responses to his comment or direct message from her.

Three hours later, James Rhodes has closed "the answers" due to the large number of comments received. “I am overwhelmed by the number of people offering to help. Thanks. I will respond privately in due course. I believe that psychological support and support/company for the elderly are priorities. You are the most. Together, stronger ”, he has communicated on Twitter.

Today I instructed my lawyer to start the creation of my foundation. It will have a wide social scope (food banks, psychological help, payment of electricity in residences and hospitals, hostels, etc.) but as it will be for all of you, what would you like the money to be used for?

— James Rhodes (@JRhodesPianist) June 17, 2022

The pianist has been in Spain for six years, and in 2020 he finally achieved Spanish nationality, which he described as the best gift of his life. The musician rose to popularity for his concerts, but especially for his memoir Instrumental, published in Spain by Blackie Books and in which he recounted how he was a victim of abuse during his childhood and how his life has been marked by that tragedy, too. how listening to Rachmaninoff on loop during his teens and discovering Bach's Adagio in a psychiatric ward helped him fight his demons and transform his life.

His testimony and his memoirs even led to the law for the protection of children against violence, approved in the Congress of Deputies last year, being baptized as the Rhodes law, which includes innovative prevention measures, and changes in the duration of crimes of sexual abuse to avoid prescription before the victim takes the step of speaking. As of this change, counting begins when the victim is 35 years old and not 18, to avoid filing many complaints.



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