October 22, 2020

Italy, Spain and France concentrate more than half of the unemployed in the EU | Economy


Most of the countries of the European Union They have managed to close one of the biggest scars left by the recession. The unemployment rate in the EU as a whole has finally returned to pre-crisis levels, below 7%, according to the annual report on employment of the European Commission. Despite the recovery in most member countries, Brussels points out three “notable exceptions”: France, Italy and Spain. Those three of the big five concentrate more than half of the unemployed in the EU. The Commission gives a touch to Spain and Italy for the poor efficiency of their social transfers to reduce the risk of poverty.

Even with relatively low economic growth rates, Europe continues to create jobs. The pace has slowed, but Brussels celebrates that, until last September, 241.5 million were occupied. “The highest level ever reached,” says the report. The data hides, however, two realities. On one side of the coin, several countries (Germany, Austria, Holland, the Czech Republic or the United Kingdom) not only enjoy full employment With rates below 4%, they also notice a labor shortage. In the other, the Mediterranean countries continue to accumulate the largest bags of unemployed despite the decline in recent years.

The European Commission’s report draws heavily on data from 2018. But Eurostat data shows that the situation remained the same last October (the last one with updated data). Spain, France and Italy added 8.3 million citizens without work. That meant 53.3% of the EU as a whole, almost 20 percentage points more than the weight of their populations. The report also highlights that within the continent there are still “large disparities at the regional level”, with some areas of Greece, Italy and Spain that “continue to register unemployment rates above 20%.” Specifically, the maps prepared by Brussels indicate two Spanish communities in red: Andalusia and Extremadura.


The labor market in Europe

By countries Annual data for 2018 in%

Greece

Spain

Italy

France

Croatia

Cyprus

Latvia

Finland

Portugal

Slovakia

Sweden

Lithuania

Belgium

Ireland

Luxembourg

Estonia

Bulgaria

Denmark

Slovenia

Austria

Romania

United Kingdom

Poland

Holland

Hungary

malt

Germany

Czech Rep.

The labor market in Europe

By countries Annual data for 2018 in%

Greece

Spain

Italy

France

Croatia

Cyprus

Latvia

Finland

Portugal

Slovakia

Sweden

Lithuania

Belgium

Ireland

Luxembourg

Estonia

Bulgaria

Denmark

Slovenia

Austria

Romania

United Kingdom

Poland

Holland

Hungary

malt

Germany

Czech Rep.

The labor market in Europe

By countries Annual data for 2018 in%

Greece

Spain

Italy

France

Croatia

Cyprus

Latvia

Finland

Portugal

Slovakia

Sweden

Lithuania

Belgium

Ireland

Luxembourg

Estonia

Bulgaria

Denmark

Slovenia

Austria

Romania

United Kingdom

Poland

Holland

Hungary

malt

Germany

Czech Rep.

Italy, Spain and France concentrate more than half of the unemployed in the EU



86 million people at risk of poverty

The wound of the Great Recession that Europe fails to heal completely it is the precariousness of a non-negligible layer of your society. According to the report, “the strong recovery” did not prevent “the percentage of the population at risk of poverty” from being high and even growing in 2018 by one million people. In total, 86 million people (17.1%) in the EU live with an income below 60% of national income. The Member States – especially Romania, Luxembourg, Spain and Italy – were not able to reduce that year the volume of citizens who, even having a job, suffer this danger. Even so, the report does highlight the rise in the minimum professional salary of 22.3% in Spain.

The other big problem facing the EU is that temporary employment It has ceased to be “a springboard to the undefined.” Spain is an example of this. According to Brussels, it is the country with the highest percentage of workers who suffer temporary involuntarily (according to the report, more than half). And at the same time, it is among the partners in which the most expensive is the step from being eventual to indefinite. Only a little more than 10% get it within three years.

The document, which must pass through the table of EU ministers, tries to collect the situation of countries in several key labor and social indicators. Brussels once again places Spain in a “critical situation” in the unemployment rate, early school leaving and the low impact of social transfers; in a delicate situation in terms of population at risk of poverty or social exclusion or in volume of ninis, and in a still weak step, although with improvements, in the equality in the income or the unemployment in the long term. On the other hand, it is among the best EU countries in the schooling of children under three years old in official daycare centers and is well above the average in health care. Finally, it is right in the EU average in the chapter on the gender gap or in the digital skills of its workers.

The high cost of the house

Housing remains a problem in the EU. According to the report prepared by the European Commission, one in 10 Europeans suffers an “excessive burden” with housing costs. That is, they allocate more than 40% of their income to the payment of their house. For 4.9%, the deprivations are “serious”, while 1.9% still have no shower or bath. This financial overload of families has been declining in recent years, partly thanks also to lower interest rates.

However, spending remains very high in Greece, where almost 40% of households must allocate more than 40% of their income to accommodation. Above average are Bulgaria, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Germany and Romania. According to the Commission, those who suffer most from this problem are the poorest families and those who are on a lease basis. In Spain, the proportion of overloaded households does not reach 10%, although the proportion is higher (up to 15%) in the case of those at risk of poverty or social exclusion.

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