"It will be the fifth pillar of the welfare state"


Pedro Sánchez avoids charging against the General Council of the Judiciary (CGPJ) in office after knock down the report of the progressive member Álvaro Cuesta who endorsed the housing law and prepare to raise another, but warns that the Government's objective is to protect the right to housing by making it the fifth pillar of the welfare state. "We will wait for the report issued by the CGPJ, we will look at it with absolute respect, we will look at all the technical questions that they want to raise; but the commitment is to build this fifth pillar of the welfare state, to redouble the public commitment to housing policy. And that is what we are going to do," the president warned about the law, whose approval scheduled for this Tuesday has had to be postponed, and also about the state housing plan or the social bonus for young people who will see the light in the Council of Ministers tomorrow.


The acting Judiciary refuses to endorse the Housing Law and delays its approval

The acting Judiciary refuses to endorse the Housing Law and delays its approval

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The president has avoided confrontation with the governing body of the judges, which United We Can has attacked, which accuses the institution that has a conservative majority with the mandate expired three years ago, of torpedoing the work of the coalition. "Absolute respect for what the CGPJ issues," he said before delving into the matter: "Let's get into the debate. The formulas that we have had in our country in these 40 years of democracy to guarantee decent access to broad layers of the population to housing have not been enough".

"The Government of Spain shares with the vast majority of citizens, no matter what they vote on the left or right because they suffer from this same shortage, the need for a greater commitment from the public sphere to make a right, an article of the Constitution, become not a problem like they are experiencing now, but a real right, which is to have decent housing", said Sánchez at a press conference together with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in Moncloa, in which he assured that the aim of the housing law is make it the "fifth pillar of the welfare state". "They are not going to distract us from our goal," Moncloa sources point out.

Sánchez, who has thanked Scholz for his contribution so that the EU agrees on the issuance of the Next Generation funds that will mean an injection of 140,000 in transfers and loans for Spain in the coming years, has taken the opportunity to demand that the PP not turn them into a "partisan issue" in the face of the judicial offensive that those of Pablo Casado have initiated, who accuse the Executive of rewarding socialist governments.

"We have two years ahead of us in which the fundamental task of the institutions is to row, lend a hand, work side by side to consolidate economic growth," defended Sánchez, who has called on the administrations, regardless of their "political color ", "move the management of European funds away from partisan issues that matter little to citizens". "Let's not make European funds a partisan issue, let's make European funds an opportunity for the country," he defended.

The meeting with Scholz, which is part of the official visits he is making in the framework of his election as chancellor, coincides with the opening of the debate within the EU on the Stability Plan. Spain is in favor of maintaining the flexibility of the fiscal rules that were applied at the beginning of the pandemic to allow an increase in public spending and that supposed limits to the public deficit and debt to 3% and 60% of GDP, respectively.

"We agree that the currently suspended fiscal rules are too complex, difficult to comply with in the context of the pandemic", said Sánchez in his initial speech: "The Government of Spain considers that it is important to reform them", said Sánchez, who considers that they have to respond to the ecological challenge and the digital transition while guaranteeing the "sustainability of finances in the medium term".

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