Israel begins a gradual return to school with the opposition of some cities



Israel today allowed primary and secondary students to return to the classrooms, although with the opposition of several municipalities, which refused to open the centers until guaranteeing coronavirus prevention measures in the classes.

While localities such as Tel Aviv, Beer Sheva, Haifa or Hadera asked for more time to prepare schools, the students returned to classrooms in other parts of the country with a mask and entering one by one to keep the physical distance with their classmates.

The Israeli government approved on Friday a plan to gradually resume education on Sunday, a working day in the country, which created some confusion among parents and reluctance in local administrations, considering it hasty.

The Ministry of Education allowed students from six to nine years old and from sixteen to eighteen to return to classrooms and, in a week, the reopening of kindergartens. The rest of the students will return to class from June.

In the case of ultra-Orthodox schools, the group with the highest number of infections in Israel, only young people between twelve and eighteen years old can return to school.

Attendance, for the moment, is not compulsory, and teachers over 65 years old or with previous pathologies will be able to opt out.

The return to school is part of the rapid de-escalation that Israel recently started, for which it has already reactivated much of the economic activity and has eased the movement restrictions of the population.

Most of the shops on public roads have reopened and the Executive is preparing a phased plan to resume social and economic activity.

Israel has so far registered 16,193 confirmed cases of coronavirus, of which more than half have already recovered, and today announced the lowest number of infections since March with 41 positives in the last 24 hours.

So far, 230 people have died, and 82 patients are connected to artificial respirators, much lower numbers than in European countries.

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