Tue. Sep 17th, 2019

Irene Gaumé: materialize the impossible | Talent


Irene Gaumé (Boston, USA, 1984) was going to be a traditional sculptor until a series of coincidences led her to discover 3D modeling. “I studied Fine Arts in Antwerp and, after leaving school, it was very difficult to find work,” he recalls. One day he started researching digital sculpture on Google until he discovered a software, ZBrush, that changed his career. “It is used in video games and animation, but when I saw the possibilities I had to print in 3D I went crazy,” he says.

That door led him to specialize as creator of works that could only exist now. "Through 3D modeling, you translate any sketch into three dimensions," he explains. “You draw and sculpt at the same time. Everything you can think of in three dimensions can be created and printed, at any scale and on any material. ”

As a member of the Factum Arte workshop, that means digital restoration projects, they create exact replicas of any piece we can see in a museum. “If you want to copy a sculpture of the Prado, for example, first you take a photogrammetry. It is like scanning through a sphere of photographs, which you process with software to build a 3D mesh. Then you can scale it and prepare a print file, ”he details.

Among those impossible works carried out we find fascinating experiments, such as recreating the skin of a missing Van Gogh. “From a 1920 photo and a painting from the same series of Van Gogh flowers that we scanned in high resolution at the National Gallery in London, I cut each brushstroke of the painter to rebuild a bas-relief surface of that painting that no longer exists".

Another project that especially excites him: the life-size recreation of a cave of the Waujá tribe, in Mato Grosso (Brazil), which was recently vandalized. “It's like recovering memory, a very emotional project. We work with the members of the tribe to be able to return their sacred place. ”

Through 3D modeling you draw and sculpt at the same time. Everything you can think of in three dimensions can be created and printed, at any scale and on any material. ”

That ability to reach where traditional art does not reach also invited her to get involved in one of the most controversial works of recent art, the ninot of King Felipe VI, devised by Santiago Sierra and Eugenio Merino, and which went through Arco 2019. “ There was a problem of scale, because I had to measure four meters, and that's why Eugenio contacted me, ”he recalls. "I had to model the head through about 200 photos, it was a challenge because we couldn't work with the original."

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