'House of Cards', rant in the White House | TV

'House of Cards', rant in the White House | TV


When it premiered in 2013 House of Cards, the television was different. Netflix was thrown into the pool and, after Lilyhammer, a Norwegian mafia drama that had become 2011 in its first original series, House of Cards it was quite a blow on the table. David Fincher, who came to direct The curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) and The social network (2010), was put behind the cameras of the first two chapters. Hollywood stars such as Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright were the protagonists. The online platform thus showed its cards to start the revolution that was about to take place and open the way to a new television, one in which the viewer is the one who has the power to say when, how and where to see the chapters. A television perhaps more solitary at times, but also much freer. One that allows you to stay until three in the morning devouring the favorite story of each without more interruptions and limits than you want to wear. After Netfllix came Hulu, Amazon, Facebook, Apple … Thanks to House of Cards we have today The Handmaid's Tale (Hulu), The Crown (Netflix) or a Julia Roberts in Homecoming (Amazon Prime Video).

'House of Cards', ranting in the White House

East thriller political, based on a British miniseries of 1990, came covered with a patina of prestige from the minute one, but too quickly began to show its true face, one much closer to the guilty pleasure and the succession of oyoyoyoys of Scandal what a The west wing of the White House. Because, although the merit of serving as a starting signal for a new television, no one can deny it, it is also true that House of Cards he has always believed himself better than he really is.

In the six seasons that has lasted – the last one can be seen in Movistar +; the rest are on Netflix, because it was premiered before in Spain it did not even occur to us that Netflix would end up producing Spanish series or elevating national productions foreign to world phenomena-, the story of Frank and Claire Underwood, a marriage thirsty for power and willing to do anything to achieve it, has gone from a thriller about the sewers of US politics and the White House more or less credible to a mad race in search of the next impossible turn. At times it has been very fun to watch; other times it has been soporiferously boring. In his last three seasons he has embraced his mamarracho side without concessions. The person in charge of the series until the fourth delivery, Beau Willimon, left the ship when it was already beginning to make water. And the farewell has arrived when she was already touched and sunk.

'House of Cards', ranting in the White House

Despite the dismissal of Kevin Spacey After the scandal of sexual abuse in which it was involved, the producers preferred to continue one more season with Robin Wright as the protagonist and take advantage of the fact that the end of the fifth installment placed Claire Underwood in the Oval Office. Although not physically present in this last batch of eight episodes, the shadow of Frank Underwood is constant. They do not spend 10 minutes without someone mentioning it or without making decisions conditioned by their previous acts. "I need to bury Francis once and for all," says Claire in one of her many interventions looking at the camera. Because yes, the character is as dead as his interpreter's career.

"There are more and more corpses," says a journalist halfway through this last stage. In House of CardsPoliticians have corpses hidden in lockers and are willing to take them out at any time to achieve their goals. This phrase is more literal than it should be, unfortunately, but the gum has stretched so much that one can expect anything.

'House of Cards', ranting in the White House

The series has wanted to introduce plots related to international political reality, include agreements and confrontations with Russia, claim feminism, the use of mobile applications that monitor their citizens, a political climate as polarized as the one that is lived today. But all this has sounded excessive. This is not The Good Fight. Not even Veep. It has been taken too seriously and has ended up being screwed.

Despite having eight episodes to prepare it, the end is too rough, cartoonish and very disappointing. It is always difficult to finish a series. Luckily for House of Cards, at this point it was difficult for anyone to come close to their conclusion maintaining high expectations. As Frank Underwood said in that first scene in which he killed a dog with his hands: "That's it, the pain is over." House of Cards It was a walking corpse, a caricature of what it had been, what it wanted to be. Now you can rest.

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