June 24, 2021

Frank Underwood against the hypocritical spectator | TV

Frank Underwood against the hypocritical spectator | TV



They will not give you any Emy for him, but Let me be Frank, the three-minute monologue that Kevin Spacey has uploaded to YouTube, is the best interpretation of his career and a milestone in the history of television. In it, characterized as Frank Underwood, the protagonist of House of Cards, it seems that speaks of the accusations of sexual abuse that have destroyed his career (and the character), although he could be talking about anything else, because the text -worked, calculated, polished, without a loophole of improvisation- is a plea for the ambiguity, starting with the title: let me be Frank / let me be frank.

The monologue only breaks into one sentence: "You are too smart for that." This comparison with the spectator, almost populist, clashes with a message that is confusing and intriguing, and seeks above all to annoy that viewer, place him at the center of the problem, force him to take sides in a dilemma. That is not achieved with winks or flattery.

What comes to say, without saying it, is that the spectator (the hypocritical spectator) has not had any problem to admire and enjoy the machinations and miseries of the very murky Underwood, but has not hesitated to execute Spacey without evidence or courts in how much a shadow of criminal doubt about him has been uncovered. The character is forgiven everything. To the person, nothing. The television viewer, formerly pacato and gazmoño, has learned to value moral ambiguity and anti-heroes (who was going to tell the producers of The house of the meadow), but when it comes to real life, it continues to handle simple codes about good and evil. Spacey or Frank or whoever is talking, accuses the subscriber to the pay TV of not having understood anything, if not that intellectual who abyss in the subtleties and paradoxes of the human soul, as it was believed, but what always it has been in fact: an inquisitor fearful of God.

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