Wed. Apr 24th, 2019

Five books to read this spring outdoors - The Province

Five books to read this spring outdoors - The Province


Readers can move away from the stove and the blanket and finally leave with books in the sun: with the arrival of spring, nothing fancy more than devour pages on terraces, balconies and park benches. Below, a selection of five ideal books to enjoy a reading afternoon:

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The Beautiful Warsaw / Norma Editorial / Anagrama

'The Reef of the Sirens', by Luna Miguel. Ed. The Beautiful Warsaw

A small book of poems about death, loss of children, motherhood, sex and life. Luna Miguel write poems on a plane, crossing the ocean on an Aeromexico plane back to Barcelona where she lives with her husband, her son and her calico cats. Also from Kyoto, Kamakura or Amsterdam, or from any other part that evokes the scenarios collected in 'The Reef of the Sirens'.

'The end of the world and before dawn', by Inio Asano. Editorial Standard

Different lives in black and white intertwine somewhere in Japan. They are ordinary people, with their jobs, their families and their miseries, and we, the readers, peek out for a few hours in their lives. This collection of manga by Inio Asano is a portrait and at the same time a praise of loneliness that grips the characters that coexist in it.

'Seda', by Alessandro Baricco. Ed. Anagram

This is not a story, but a story, that of Hervé Joncour, a man that crosses the world and arrives until Japan in search of worms that elaborate the raw material of which lives. In a small French town his wife, Helene, waits. But this it's not just a love story, because then, according to Baricco, he would not have deserved to tell it. Whatever it is, 'Silk' is read in a sigh, at the end of a tea, but it is one of those stories that you treasure forever.

Salamander / Alba Editorial

'The granddaughter of Mr Lihn', by Philippe Claudel. Ed. Salamandra

Mr. Lihn disembarks with his little granddaughter, Sang Diu, in a European city whose name is not named. It has no ownership or understanding of the language of the country it has gone to. The old man right away Forges a friendship with Mr. Bark, who has just become a widower, although for the linguistic problem they can not give themselves anything other than company.

'The interesting ones', by Meg Wolitzer. Alba Editorial

Six teenagers gather at a summer camp outside of New York. Everyone loves Günter Grass and Anaïs Nin and they rely heavily on their talent and on the idea that they are special. In addition, everyone wants to be an artist when they grow up. 'The interesting ones' tells their story forty years later, when they are adults and reality has been imposed on the wishes.

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