Fri. Aug 23rd, 2019

Emilio Lara wins the Edhasa prize with a story of warrior children in the Crusades

Emilio Lara gana el premio Edhasa con una historia de niños guerreros en las Cruzadas



Warrior children who undertake a long journey. The Andalusian Emilio Lara (Jaén, 1969) has won the second edition of the Edhasa Award for Historical Narratives, endowed with 10,000 euros, with his novel Times of hope, set in the so-called Children's Crusade. The plot begins in 1212, when a troop of children crusaders cross France in the direction of Jerusalem, commanded by the pastorcillo Esteban de Cloyes and with Juan, son of a Castilian nobleman assassinated, like main personage. Another key location in the plot is Seville, where the Caliph Almohad al-Nasir prepares his march on a frightened Rome, to fulfill the promise that his horses will be watered in the Vatican sources.





For the jury, the awarded work is "a choral novel with an admirably resolved structure" that "manages to develop several parallel intrigues, with characters always alive and well drawn and in different scenarios."


Lara, anthropologist and high school teacher, broke into literature not long ago

Lara, anthropologist and high school teacher, broke into literature not long ago, first with The brotherhood of the Invincible Navy (2016), work set in 1588, and then with The watchmaker of the Puerta del Sol (2017), set in the nineteenth century and based on José Rodríguez Losada, the man who built the famous clock of the Puerta del Sol Madrid, which still gives the year-end bells. Both titles are published in Edhasa.

In its first edition, last year, the award went to the work Lain The bastard of the Galician Francisco Narla, acclimated in century XIII and carried out by a boy who undertakes a tortuous trip to obtain the recognition of his father, lost in the crusades.

The circumstance occurs that the last novel Planeta prize has been for Yo, Julia of Santiago Posteguillo, one of Romans that fits like a glove with the requirements of this other young prize, whose jury belongs to Posteguillo himself with journalists Jacinto Antón, Mari Pau Domínguez and Sergio Vila-Sanjuán, the writer Carlos García Gual and the editor of Edhasa, Daniel Fernández.






The plot begins in 1212, when a troop of children crusaders cross France in the direction of Jerusalem








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