Wed. Apr 24th, 2019

Cartoons will teach crafts crafts Gran Canaria - The Province

Cartoons will teach crafts crafts Gran Canaria - The Province


The two characters, a girl of the present and an aboriginal boy who travels in time, they interact with artisans to discover that ancestral practices still survive.

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The animated characters Sara and Darmo, a present girl and an aboriginal boy who travels to the present, will be in charge of teaching schoolchildren the artisan tradition of Gran Canaria through their adventures in a short film that combines animation with real images and that has been presented today by the Cabildo of Gran Canaria.

'Sara and Darmo, and artisan crafts' was produced by the Insular Institution and carried out by the filmmaker Armando Ravelo to relate in a didactic way the history of craftsmanship on the island to students of Children and of the first cycle of Primary so that they know the traditional culture and what still lasts of the ancestral techniques, explained the president of the Cabildo, Antonio Morales, during his presentation at the Insular Library, where a summary of the short film could be viewed.

This new audiovisual, 15 minutes long, is an action of the Foundation for Ethnography and Development of the Canary Islands Crafts (Fedac) in its endeavor to disseminate the tangible and intangible heritage among the school population and will be delivered to Teacher Centers, Department of Education and Culture and associations to be projected to children, explained the Minister of Crafts, Minerva Alonso.

This is a film that is framed in the Bentejuí Project, a work helmed by Armando Ravelo that has adapted to the cinema, the theater and the novel stories based on key episodes in the history of the Canary Islands.

The adventures of Sara and Darmo

Sara and Darmo are two nine-year-olds who meet thanks to the Magic Cave, a place in which Darmo can travel back in time, and who embark on an adventure to discover if aboriginal practices survive. To find out, they go to the Fedac, where they explain that crafts such as pottery and rush basketry still maintain that tradition.

The adventures of these two little ones will lead them to meet the potter of Lugarejos María León and the basket of reeds of Santa Lucía de Tirajana Juan Ramírez so that Darmo can verify that both elaborate the objects in a similar way to his family.

Thanks to the stories of these two artisans, Sara and Darmo, and also the schoolchildren, they will know the changes that these trades have experienced over the centuries and how they have adapted to the materials and the demands of the population.

The adventures of both do not culminate in this short film, since it is a pilot chapter of a series that could lead them in the future to learn about other ancestral practices.

A dissemination project focused on the youngest

Antonio Morales recalled that Fedac began in 2015 a project to spread the traditional culture with different strategies, and one of them was to reach the youngest ones so that they know the traditions and hallmarks of Gran Canaria.

This short film continues with this line of work that has led Fedac to develop didactic booklets and learning guides for the Carnival in Gran Canaria and in the Canary Islands, traditional games, Los Finaos and Los Ranchos de Ánimas for schoolchildren due to the demand of teachers, mothers and fathers.

To these dissemination works is also added the production carried out by Cancionero Isleño for Fedac, in collaboration with the Ministry of Education of the Cabildo, to make DVDs of ethnography songs adapted to Children and Primary, as well as didactic booklets, available to schools. It is an initiative that will be reissued this year.

In addition, the Cabildo annually awards grants to associations that work with children like the Order of the Puppy, the Association Choirs and Dances and the Tyldet School Workshop with the aim of rescuing and transmitting customs and traditions so that from small they know their identity.

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