A look at Mexico and Central America in six documentaries | Culture

A look at Mexico and Central America in six documentaries | Culture


With the purpose of opening a space for the production of documentary film narrated from its social actors within the indigenous and Afro-American communities in Mexico and Central America, in topics ranging from migration and indigenous peoples, to inclusion and social transformation or citizen participation and racial equity, the Gabriel García Márquez Stimulus for Cinematographic Creation in Mexico and Central America was launched in 2014 by the Mexican Institute of Cinematography (Imcine) and the Ford Foundation.

Two years after its incursion, this initiative has launched three annual calls, currently supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and supported the realization of 56 projects, of which six can be viewed online throughout Mexico through FilminLatino. Its primary intention lies in creating bridges so that cultures meet and the technological gap is limited; and blur borders to generate greater awareness and empathy with the other, because all films derived from EGGM are made by indigenous or Afro-descendants.

Light-footed, by Juan Carlos Núñez (Mexico, 2016)

A frame of 'Feet light'.
A frame of 'Feet light'.

In the nineties, Rarámuris runners Victoriano Churo and Cirildo Chacarito broke all athletic records in long flowered dresses. Today they keep running, even from oblivion, to survive.

Artemio, by Sandra Luz López Barroso (Mexico, 2017)

A scene from 'Artemio'.
A scene from 'Artemio'.

A ten-year-old boy born in the United States decides to stay in Mexico with his mother and his new family. Although its origin is in another country it is difficult to feel part of this place. Both characters make us look at a reality where the distance with what they left behind is present in each phone call. Artemio raises the phenomenon of migration from the point of view of a child and his narrative, full of emotion, shows how beautiful and simple life is. This short film was nominated for the Ariel and has participated in competitions such as Ambulante and the Morelia International Film Festival.

Sunú, by Teresa Camou Guerrero (Mexico, 2015)

A frame of 'Sunú'.
A frame of 'Sunú'.

Through the testimony of small, medium and large producers of corn in Mexico, Sunú presents a mosaic of stories that evidence the current threat that falls on the rural world and plunges into the heart of a country, where people encourage their determination to follow being free, to work the land and cultivate its seeds; to live their culture and their spirituality in a society that does not value them but at the same time needs them.

People of sea and wind, by Ingrid Eunice Fabián (Mexico, 2014)

A scene from the film by Ingrid Eunice Fabián.
A scene from the film by Ingrid Eunice Fabián.

People of sea and wind tells the story of Álvaro Obregón and La Venta, two places located on the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in Oaxaca. Communities of fishermen and ranchers who have resisted the threat of megaprojects by transnational corporations for several years and today are disturbed by the negative consequences brought by different wind companies.

Territory released, by Augusto César Díaz (Guatemala, 2015)

A frame of 'Territory released'.
A frame of 'Territory released'.

Documentary about the family history of the Guatemalan director. His mother always told him that his father was a vanished revolutionary hero, so the director undertakes the search for the truth and ends up making an unforgettable journey.

The bones room, by Marcela Zamora (Mexico, El Salvador, 2015)

The film by Marcela Zamora.
The film by Marcela Zamora.

From the Institute of Legal Medicine, the quarter of the bones accompanies several Salvadoran mothers in search of their missing children because of the violence that is experienced in their country. Every month the morgue receives a score of unclaimed bodies that perished in gang conflicts and under this obscure statistic the documentary is detonated.

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