December 1, 2020

‘123456’, the worst password of the year


The key & # 039; 123456 & # 039;  it has been used by more than 2.5 million people this year.

The password ‘123456’ has been used by more than 2.5 million people this year.
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This year ‘123456‘ has become the most frequent password leaked by cybercriminals worldwide, displayed about 24 million times, followed by ‘123456789‘and both can be deciphered in less than a second.

The password manager NordPass has made a list of the 200 most common passwords of 2020 in which it details the number of times it has been exposed, used and the time it would take to crack it.

The list is led by the key ‘123456’, which has been used by more than 2.5 million Internet users and it has been exposed about 24 million times, followed by ‘123456789’, used by more than 961,000 users and that has been exposed 7.8 million times. Plus, both can be decrypted in less than a second, according to NordPass in its review.

In the third place of the most common passwords of 2020 is a new key in the list: ‘picture1’, which has been used by 371,612 users and has been filtered 11,190 times, something that may be due to the fact that it can be decrypted in approximately three hours.

Another of the new passwords that are among the ten most common keys this year is ‘senha’ (password in Portuguese), which has been used by more than 167,000 Internet users, has been filtered 8,213 times and can be decrypted in approximately 10 seconds.

Among the most used keys registered by NordPass, most are simple and repetitive sequences of numbers and letters, although there are also other categories such as the word ‘password’ (which is in fourth position on the list), food , sports or swearing.

The 200 most frequent passwords are often repeated year after year, and according to Nordpass, only 78 of the total keys in the 2020 list were not present in last year’s, in which ‘12345’ was the most common.

In this regard, NordPass recommends that users avoid using combinations of numbers or letters such as ‘qwerty’ or ‘123456’, as they are too easy to crack, as well as passwords based on personal details such as phone number, date of birth or name.

The company also recommends that the same password not be used for multiple accounts, that it be a password of at least 12 characters with uppercase, lowercase, numbers, and symbols, and that it be changed approximately every 90 days.

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